Discussion:
Kubrick was THE MAN!!!!!!
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Don Stockbauer
2015-06-15 23:24:18 UTC
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That subject is true.
kelpzoidzl
2015-06-16 01:55:22 UTC
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Here! Here!

I just preordered that "Making of 2001" Taschen book on amazon. The original was over a thousand and this is the economy edition in the 60 dollar range. Comes out around Sept 15.
s***@hotmail.com
2015-06-16 07:51:29 UTC
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Post by kelpzoidzl
I just preordered that "Making of 2001" Taschen book on amazon. The original was over a thousand and this is the economy edition in the 60 dollar range. Comes out around Sept 15.
I'm wondering how many colour pages and fold-outs will be transposed to this econo edition. Considering that Amazon cites 562 pages for $63, and Taschen's "Napoleon" econo fit everything in using newsprint quality.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/3836559544/

Steve
kelpzoidzl
2015-06-17 10:09:28 UTC
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Post by s***@hotmail.com
I'm wondering how many colour pages and fold-outs will be transposed to this econo edition. Considering that Amazon cites 562 pages for $63, and Taschen's "Napoleon" econo fit everything in using newsprint quality.
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/3836559544/

Steve >>>>

Me too. What I don't understand is thw Amazon listing says shipping wright is only 1.7 ibs. Napoleon is almost 10 ibs.
Maybe it will require an even more powerful magnifying glass.
h***@gmail.com
2015-06-16 22:39:11 UTC
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Post by Don Stockbauer
That subject is true.
No, Bruce Jenner was A man, now, not so much...

---
William Ernest "I Liked Wendy Carlos' Work On 'A Clockwork Orange'"
Don Stockbauer
2015-06-17 02:01:08 UTC
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In the movie 2001 ASO Bowman forgot his helmet when he went EVA to try to help Poole. In a later scene we see the rack of spacesuits in the pod bay and there is a slot where Bowman took a suit and left the helmet behind. This is inconceivable, to have the helmet right in front of him and not take it! It's as if Clarke was desperate to have Kubrick depict Bowman breathing vacuum to get back in Discovery, since Clarke was proud of his idea that humans could be exposed to vacuum for short periods with no ill effects.
kelpzoidzl
2015-06-17 10:27:19 UTC
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In the movie 2001 ASO Bowman forgot his helmet when he went EVA to try to help Poole. In a later scene we see the rack of spacesuits in the pod bay and there is a slot where Bowman took a suit and left the helmet behind. This is inconceivable, to have the helmet right in front of him and not take it! It's as if Clarke was desperate to have Kubrick depict Bowman breathing vacuum to get back in Discovery, since Clarke was proud of his idea that humans could be exposed to vacuum for short periods with no ill effects. <<<<
we all should try it.
Don Stockbauer
2015-06-17 17:24:06 UTC
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We should all try about two hours of vacuum each, after all the Earth is heavily overpopulated.
kelpzoidzl
2015-06-17 18:14:46 UTC
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Christine Jorgensen was a Bronx native, two years older than Kubrick.

Wendy Carlos became a New Yorker.

From: Film Score Monthly - March 1999

WORKING WITH STANLEY

JB: How did you get involved with A Clockwork Orange originally?

WC: Well, we [Carlos and longtime producer Rachel Elkind] were Kubrick fans all along, and we had been invited by two different Hollywood people to score some science-fiction movies right after Switched-on Bach came out. One of them was Marooned, the Gregory Peck film, which ended up with no soundtrack. The producers and director decided that maybe they were wrong to put any music in, and so they told us that they'd changed their minds: while they loved what we were doing, they went with a strictly sound-effects score.

JB: That's funny because Marooned has sort of fallen into the public domain and it's been repackaged with at least one different title, something like Space Travelers. In order to cover that up, there's a different title sequence that uses electronic music.

WC: That's very strange. We had been disappointed in that project and we had gotten jazzed up to do a couple of these, and we finally wound up talking with someone who had a close connection to Stanley Kubrick's lawyer. We suddenly got an invitation to fly to London and quite a few people behind the scenes helped pull it together.

JB: How was Kubrick to work with?

WC: I got to know him quite well; don't forget I also met him again when I was involved with The Shining, although that didn't produce much of a film score.

I like Stanley He's just a very likable person to me; he's a former New Yorker and I like New York - that's why I'm situated here. I'm somewhat of an intellectual snob; I hate to be, but I like people who make me laugh and give me things that make me think deeply and who take ideas that I have and twist them around and come up with other variations. I kind of get off on that; I'm a puzzle solver, and he's a puzzle person, and he's very open. You can ask him anything, and I asked him a whole ton of questions about the cinematography because I'm sort of a frustrated cinematographer myself, and he talked about everything.

We got along very well; it's just that unfortunately he works alone in London without a lot of feedback; he doesn't have a lot of people who are willing to say no to him, and I think that's not been the healthiest environment for him. I would say that about any artist, and I've told him this to his face. I think that's why The Shining was a less productive venture for us. However, it was a lot of fun and I enjoyed the time with him; we had many long phone chats when he was just getting up and I was just going to bed; it was a pleasurable venture in many ways.

I just now had the pleasure of going back and getting some of the master tapes, and I found a few cues that that had never been out that we put on the restored Clockwork Orange CD. You couldn't have asked me about Kubrick's film at a better time because it's very much in my memory now.

JB: Are these cues that were in the film or unused cues?

WC: One of these is the "Orange Minuet," which we had written for the scene in which the woman who has her breasts showing appears on-stage in what looks like a school auditorium. Originally that scene just had a few temp tracks in it, and one of them was done by the people who did "I Want to Marry a Lighthouse Keeper," in slightly English, folk music kind of tradition.

We suggested that probably a real minuet in a real minuet style might be a fortuitous thing to put there, and of course I cheated and put 5/8 into the 6/8 meters in the minuet we were writing, but managed to come up with nice tune. Kubrick's business manager and several of the other people he was working with fell in love with this minuet and they wanted to put it into the film. Well at that time they had had so many months of listening to the temp track, and you know what happens: they got locked in. It's very hard not to have that happen to you. He couldn't bear to part with the music that he had heard ever since they first started editing, so in the end the minuet wouldn't work in any other scene.

They wanted to put it out as a single but they made their apologies and were very sincere. So it was one of those sad things where we wished it had gone into the film but it couldn't, and there was no room for it on the Warner Bros. album or the CBS release, so the thing sat in a semi-mixed-down state for 22 years.

There was a cue that was done for another scene which had the same exact thing happen to it. It's the scene in the prison library: Alex's fantasies in there were scored with Scheherezade, and we did something much more in the spirit of the thing with parody. When he's whipping Christ carrying the cross, we used a very Romanesque, kind of Miklos Rozsa thing to the tune of "I Love a Parade," and then when he starts having the girls by him it was, "I Want a Girl Just Like the Girl That Married Dear Old Dad," but done in the style of Scheherezade. I don't know if Stanley even got the joke; he just told us it didn't sound right to him, that the other things were more fitting of the scene. We tried and he gave us the chance, and in the end still wanted to stay with his temp score - he does that all the time.

So those are two tracks that I wanted to have out for years, and in restoring all the other tracks it was fun to pull those out. I think the thing sounds awfully good; some of those masters were done in four-channel surround sound back when we thought the movie was going to be in stereo, and they sound good because they're master mixes and the tapes are in good shape. It was done before they started using tape that turns to glue, and there was no need to bake it or anything; they sound fine. So I just rebuilt the four-track, had a few tech people come in and help me, and did a careful alignment and it went right into 20-bit converters and sounds very good. Even the bad-sounding tracks aren't very bad; they're a whole lot better than anything people have heard until now. So I'm getting a big kick out of this.

JB: Did you run into Kubrick's temp-track fetish in any other places?

WC: Oh, yeah. We heard it with a lot of things. When we did Clockwork, though, we were able to suggest that we could do alternate versions of the beloved temp track pieces. So the Purcell that he had, which was a very stodgy British performance that was authentic, but fairly routine and dull, turned into this whole title music sequence because he loved all of the sounds that we did. As long as we could satisfy some element like the William Tell, which was my speeded-up silly trick, he was happy. He still had the original thing that he was secure with, but he also had these neat new sounds, so he was getting his cake and eating it too.

It was only when we had to change the musical themes like the two cues that were dropped that these things didn't get used. And of course I've heard the legendary story of the 2001 score that Alex North did, and Alex North is a fine composer and of course that's been released now on Jerry Goldsmith's performance; it would have made it a very different picture.

JB: It would have made it a great science fiction movie, but I think he was making more of a postmodern thing.

WC: In a funny way not having the music makes the picture cut loose and float free as its own thing, but if we had been used to it, I don't think we would have been disturbed by it (North's score), because it was clearly not anything hackneyed - it was not your usual sci-fi cliches. In fact he cobbled together some of his material later on when he did Dragonslayer, and some of it is very effective there. If you played the two CDs side by side you can hear the theme is the same.

JB: Why don't you do more movies?

WC: Well I've scarcely made my livelihood in film things; I almost never pursue film. I have friends who are always trying to get me on another film and saying this thing or that thing would work great in a film, and I'm saying okay, I like the process, it's another discipline, but if you'll excuse the pretentiousness of this comment, I'm a little more like Aaron Copland. I make my own art music and it is whatever it is. It can be aimed in directions, like the "Clockwork Black" was definitely influenced by other people's comments, but usually I don't do films until people approach me and that's what's always happened: other people act as connectors to get me on film scores.

I just finished this film that was done with people we knew who were doing a small film, and they were frightened I'd be insulted if they asked me about it - and I said no, as a matter of fact. The last two projects I worked on were for some European people whose films never saw the light of day and the projects folded.

People don't know that I've worked on other film scores, but I was itchy to do it again. There's something nice about the formality. It's discipline; you have a structure to work with, and I guess it's Igor Stravinsky's comment, "I like exact specifications." He said that when somebody asked him why he writes so many ballets and doesn't he find it restrictive? And the answer is no.

I guess there are crazies out there who think, "Oh, no, my creativity must be unbounded," but that's not how it works in the real world. I like collaborating with people, I always have, and I welcome any chance to do it. Usually it doesn't happen so I do my own projects with my own people like the Tales of Heaven and Hell. But I would love to see that used in some kind of film project, and I've been told already that some people are interested in it for another film project. I can see where it would work.K
kelpzoidzl
2015-06-17 18:20:35 UTC
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From 2001: A Space Odyssey, by Arthur C. Clarke (1968):
"Like any properly trained man in good health, he could survive in vacuum for at least a minute - if he had time to prepare for it. But there had been no time; he could only count on the normal fifteen seconds of consciousness before his brain was starved and anoxia overcame him. Even then, he could still recover completely after one or two minutes in vacuum - if he was properly recompressed; it took a long time for the body fluids to start boiling, in their various well-protected systems. "

Sir Arthur has it about correct: roughly nine to fifteen seconds of consciousness

Vacuum Exposure in Science Fiction

"2001" was neither the first nor the last science fiction story to feature a character surviving unprotected exposure to space. There are a number of science fiction stories with scenes in which a character is exposed to space without a space suit (or at least without a space helmet) and survives. Here is a brief list of some of the science fiction stories and movies that have featured scenes in which a human survives an unprotected exposure to space.

Print

Nathan Schachner and Arthur Zagat, "Exiles of the Moon" (1931) (*)
Letter, Wonder Stories, April 1932
Stanley Weinbaum, "The Red Peri" (1935)
Arthur C. Clarke (**), Earthlight (1955)
Arthur C. Clarke, "Take a Deep Breath" (1957)
Arthur C. Clarke, 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)
John Varley, The Ophiuchi Hotline (1977)
Douglas Adams, Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy (1979)
Charles Sheffield, "All the Colors of the Vacuum" (1981; collected in The MacAndrew Chronicles)
Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle, Footfall (1985)
Stephen Baxter, "The Quagma Datum" (1989; collected in Vacuum Diagrams 1997)
Allen Steele, "Exiles of the Morning Star" (1999)
Gregory Benford, The Mars Race (1999)
Ben Bova, The Precipice (2001)
Jack McDevitt, Chindi (2002)
In addition to this list, Larry Niven's story "The Borderlands of Sol"(included in the collection Flatlander) includes a decompression scene in which the main character, although not exposed to complete vacuum, considers the possible effects of vacuum exposure, and Robert Heinlein's "Gentlemen, Be Seated!" (1948) features humans who are exposed to vacuum over a selected portion of their bodies
Movies and TV

2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)
Mobile Suit Gundam: "Char's Counterattack" (animated, 1988)
Star Trek, the Next Generation, "Disaster", Season 5, episode 105 (1991)
Event Horizon (1997)
Cowboy Bebop, "Heavy Metal Queen," Season 1, episode seven (volume 4) (animated, 1999)
Script
Farscape: "Look at the Princess, Part Two: I Do, I Think," Season 2, episode 12 (2000)
Titan AE (animated, 2000)
Stargate SG-1, "Tangent" episode 12, Season 4 (2000)
Star Trek: Enterprise: the Augments, 4th season, Episode 82 (2004)
Stargate Atlantis, "Thirty-Eight Minutes," Episode 4 (2004)
Battlestar Galactica: A Day in the Life, 3rd Season, episode 15, (2007)
Sunshine (2007)
Doctor Who, The Time of Angels, fifth series, episode 4 (2010)
It's noteworthy that twenty years passed between the first time a human survived exposure to vacuum in film, and the second; while over the most recent ten years, eight different shows featured this.
Poetry

Theodora Goss, Nine Seconds (2001)
panel from Space 1999 comic book
Space: 1999, Vol 2, No 6
"Instinctively he exhales, forcing all the air from his lungs, delaying their own explosive decompression... Yet even so he has but fifteen seconds..."
Comics

The fact that a human can survive a brief exposure to vacuum has even made it to the comics world:
John Byrne, "Flotsam," Space: 1999 Vol 2, No 6 (Sept. 1976)
Chris Claremont and Dave Cockrum, "Deathstar, Rising!" The Uncanny X-Men #99 (June 1977)
Denny O'Neil, "Earth-Asylum," Green Lantern co-starring Green Arrow, Vol. 16, No. 103 (Apr. 1978)
Chris Claremont, "Pursuit!" The Uncanny X-Men, issue #156 (Apr. 1982)
cover from Green Lantern-Green Arrow comic book
This list does not list the many movies and science fiction stories in which human vacuum exposure is treated with no attempt at realism; such as "Outland" (where people exposed to vacuum explode),"Total Recall" (in which Arnold Schwarzenegger can survive near-vacuum conditions by holding his breath until an alien artifact gives Mars an atmosphere), "The Empire Strikes Back" (in which Luke, Leia, and Solo exit the ship to walk around an "asteroid" with no suits), or Jules Verne's From Earth to Moon, in which the characters open and shut the hatch of their capsule while in transit (but open it so quickly that "scarcely a particle of air" escapes.)

Another form of vacuum exposure in science fiction is the use of variant forms of the "skinsuit," a spacesuit that maintains mechanical pressure on the skin, but does not provide an airtight seal. This suit was originally proposed by Webb as the "Space Activity Suit" (Aerospace Medicine, 39 (1968), pp. 376-383), but was introduced into science fiction in an article by Jerry Pournelle. There are many variants of these in science fiction, ranging from the reasonable to the highly implausible. A difficulty in long-term use of such a suit is that tissue exposed to vacuum, even if mechanical pressure prevents boiling of the fluid, will nevertheless tend to desiccate in vacuum.

Space scenes from 2001: A Space Odyssey (from youtube)
Mike Brotherton's page of Movie Scenes with People Exposed to Vacuum
Back to vacuum exposure page.
Back to Landis home page
footnotes
*The earliest science fiction work in which a character survives exposure to vacuum is apparently the three-part serial "Exiles of the Moon," by Nathan Schachner and Arthur Leo Zagat, appearing in Hugo Gernsback's magazine Wonder Stories, no. 28-30, Sept-Nov 1931. (cover).
In response to readers' letters, Schachner defended his character's survival of an exposure to the vasuum of space in a long letter "He Would Not Explode", in Wonder Stories, April 1932. The letter starts out::
"Two of your correspondents, Messrs. Kaletsky and McCutcheon, have attacked our story "Exiles of the Moon", on the ground that Dore Swithin should have died immediately in outer space upon being ejected from the space ship because of the total lack of pressure."
Schacter justifies the scene as written, stating:
...It is quite evident therefore, that Dore Swithin's exposure of less than four minutes to the vacuum of space would not result in his instant explosion and that there would be a fair chance of his survival. Men submerged in water for periods of over 10 minutes have survived with the use of the pulmotor. It must be remembered that Dore Swithin did not emerge scatheless. The story specifically set forth that the surface capillaries had been broken, that his face and body were terribly congested, that there was bleeding from his mouth and ears, and that it took him a long time to recover from his frightful experience."

I have yet to track down a copy of the original story. If anybody with a copy (or access to a copy) of the story could verify the reference, I would like to see it!

** In addition to the referenced short stories, Arthur C. Clarke discusses vacuum survival and justifies the events shown in his stories in his essay "A Breath of Fresh Vacuum," in his book The View From Serendip (1977).

Page by Geoffrey A. Landis,1999
Revision 2007, 2010
Don Stockbauer
2015-06-17 19:32:41 UTC
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The idea is that they wanted to depict a human exposed to vacuum, and they did this by Bowman not having a space helmet and being exposed to
vacuum but it was unlikely that he would have forgotten his helmet when he put on the body of the suit because the helmet was right there with the rest of the suit.
kelpzoidzl
2015-06-17 20:02:59 UTC
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And it was a striking idea, that did seem off, when first seeing the film. As it turns out, Clatke appears to have been correct.
Don Stockbauer
2015-06-17 23:59:46 UTC
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I agree. It's just that somehow they shudda had Bowman forget his helmet in some other way than it being right in front of him when he put the body of the suit on. But then, perhaps it is so minor as to be ignored. Which it appears to be.
kelpzoidzl
2015-06-18 05:42:18 UTC
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Also Bowman was rushing to recover Pooles body and didn't know Hal would lock him out.
Don Stockbauer
2015-06-18 12:05:54 UTC
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In the book the issue doesn't come up because Bowman never goes EVA, he just immediately goes about reviving an astronaut to replace Poole! As he's doing that HAL vents the air from Discovery and Bowman has to get to an emergency kiosk. Kubrick wanted something more interesting for the film than what Clarke came up with, no Bowman EVA.
kelpzoidzl
2015-06-18 23:34:00 UTC
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Just guessing that Kubrick was intrigued by the idea, that Bowman could be outside without a Helmet for a short time.

I just received and reading Nabokov's original screenplay for Lolita. Nabokov has said he liked the film but never understood why Kubrick didn't exactly stick to his script.
Don Stockbauer
2015-06-19 03:48:36 UTC
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Clarke liked to promote the exposure to vacuum idea, he used it in other stories of his. From what I understand, Clarke and Kubrick had parted ways when Kubrick came up with the exposure to vacuum without a helmet scenes. Clarke apparently approved of what Kubrick came up with.

I read Lolita many years ago, but never Nabokov's screenplay. Much of the book was in French, but if you couldn't read the French you got the idea pretty well from the English.
kelpzoidzl
2015-06-19 04:46:27 UTC
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Kubrick and Clarke never parted ways, but after everything was submitted by Clarke then Clarke kicked back and Kubrick did what he wanted. Same with Nabokov. In these two cases, neither author bad-mouthed Kubrick, as Burgess or some other writers did.

The Lolita script is in perfect English and quite good, but not as much outlandish Quilty humor Cot humor etc. and Nabokov was taken aback a little by the flashforward in the beginning, but took it in stride when Kubrick redid some things, adding more bizarre humor and chopped some things. Nabokov's script would have been a four hour film, accirding to Kubrick. He felt the end at the beginning, was also better for the film. I agree. It gave it a air of mystery as to how it had evolved for mikd mannered Humbert to kill Quilty. Also, it's obvious Kubrick wanted Peter Sellers to have plenty of screen time to work his comedy magic.
Don Stockbauer
2015-06-19 13:28:39 UTC
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I meant parted ways physically. They did remain friends and they communicated.
kelpzoidzl
2015-06-19 20:18:09 UTC
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Yep
Don Stockbauer
2015-06-19 22:22:07 UTC
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k
h***@gmail.com
2015-06-19 22:54:30 UTC
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Post by kelpzoidzl
Kubrick and Clarke never parted ways, but after everything was submitted by Clarke then Clarke kicked back and Kubrick did what he wanted. Same with Nabokov. In these two cases, neither author bad-mouthed Kubrick, as Burgess or some other writers did.
The Lolita script is in perfect English and quite good, but not as much outlandish Quilty humor Cot humor etc. and Nabokov was taken aback a little by the flashforward in the beginning, but took it in stride when Kubrick redid some things, adding more bizarre humor and chopped some things. Nabokov's script would have been a four hour film, accirding to Kubrick. He felt the end at the beginning, was also better for the film. I agree. It gave it a air of mystery as to how it had evolved for mikd mannered Humbert to kill Quilty. Also, it's obvious Kubrick wanted Peter Sellers to have plenty of screen time to work his comedy magic.
Clark complained that Stanley was difficult to work with and deceptive
when he tried to publish the novel before the movie came out. Burgess did
a little griping about Kubrick's movie, but not enough to stop him from
handling the publicity tour duties for the movie (he went on all the talk
shows in lieu of Kubrick).

This has been bugging me for a while now, it's related to a game show
or shows. What IS the first line of the novel "Lolita"? I'm not sure
exactly, and I don't want to dig around for the book, but I'm pretty
sure it's not "Lolita.", as some game shows claim...(for $250,000, what
is the first line spoken in "2001", actual dollar amount question, I
could answer it in my sleep).

---
William Ernest "It Also Was Not 'Lolita'" Reid
m***@yahoo.com
2015-06-20 00:38:17 UTC
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Post by h***@gmail.com
Post by kelpzoidzl
Kubrick and Clarke never parted ways, but after everything was submitted by Clarke then Clarke kicked back and Kubrick did what he wanted. Same with Nabokov. In these two cases, neither author bad-mouthed Kubrick, as Burgess or some other writers did.
The Lolita script is in perfect English and quite good, but not as much outlandish Quilty humor Cot humor etc. and Nabokov was taken aback a little by the flashforward in the beginning, but took it in stride when Kubrick redid some things, adding more bizarre humor and chopped some things. Nabokov's script would have been a four hour film, accirding to Kubrick. He felt the end at the beginning, was also better for the film. I agree. It gave it a air of mystery as to how it had evolved for mikd mannered Humbert to kill Quilty. Also, it's obvious Kubrick wanted Peter Sellers to have plenty of screen time to work his comedy magic.
Clark complained that Stanley was difficult to work with and deceptive
when he tried to publish the novel before the movie came out. Burgess did
a little griping about Kubrick's movie, but not enough to stop him from
handling the publicity tour duties for the movie (he went on all the talk
shows in lieu of Kubrick).
This has been bugging me for a while now, it's related to a game show
or shows. What IS the first line of the novel "Lolita"? I'm not sure
exactly, and I don't want to dig around for the book, but I'm pretty
sure it's not "Lolita.", as some game shows claim...(for $250,000, what
is the first line spoken in "2001", actual dollar amount question, I
could answer it in my sleep).
---
William Ernest "It Also Was Not 'Lolita'" Reid
Some game shows claim the first line of the novel is "Lolita"??? Meaning like three game shows--or even two?

A quick Google search of the Internet offers this: "Lolita, light of my life" with tedious analyses involving symmetry, moths, flames and even lepidoptery.
h***@gmail.com
2015-06-22 01:10:18 UTC
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Post by m***@yahoo.com
Post by h***@gmail.com
This has been bugging me for a while now, it's related to a game show
or shows. What IS the first line of the novel "Lolita"? I'm not sure
exactly, and I don't want to dig around for the book, but I'm pretty
sure it's not "Lolita.", as some game shows claim...(for $250,000, what
is the first line spoken in "2001", actual dollar amount question, I
could answer it in my sleep).
Some game shows claim the first line of the novel is "Lolita"??? Meaning like three game shows--or even two?
I think they had the same question on "Jeopardy!" and "Who Wants To Be
A Millionaire"...
Post by m***@yahoo.com
A quick Google search of the Internet offers this: "Lolita, light of my life" with tedious analyses involving symmetry, moths, flames and even lepidoptery.
Yes, but that is the first line of Humbert's jailhouse confessional.
It is preceded by a Forward written by a fictional prison psychiatrist
who introduces the jailhouse confessional, and provides spoilers about
the fate of all the characters described in the confessional (Dolores
Haze died in childbirth, etc.).

The actual first line of the novel, which was written in epistolary
style, would be the first line of the Forward, not necessarily the
full TITLE. What was that? Like I say, I'm too lazy to lean over and
pull it out of my bookshelf (it IS a big bookshelf)...I just want
somebody to say "Here you are, sir" and give it to me...

---
William Ernest "Lately I'm Too Pooped To Google, And Vice Versa" Reid
Don Stockbauer
2015-06-22 02:48:33 UTC
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My friend Bill,

Tomorrow I'll trek on over to my old trailer house I use to live in and retrieve the copy to lay to rest this conundrum of all time.

Sincerely yours,

Don Stockbauer
m***@yahoo.com
2015-06-22 03:34:31 UTC
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Post by Don Stockbauer
My friend Bill,
Tomorrow I'll trek on over to my old trailer house I use to live in and retrieve the copy to lay to rest this conundrum of all time.
Sincerely yours,
Don Stockbauer
http://genius.com/Vladimir-nabokov-lolita-foreword-and-chapter-one-annotated
Don Stockbauer
2015-06-22 03:37:55 UTC
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Hey! Saved me from having to go outside.
kelpzoidzl
2015-06-22 11:08:28 UTC
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I already answed the question, twice.
h***@gmail.com
2015-06-22 23:18:31 UTC
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Post by kelpzoidzl
I already answed the question, twice.
You answered it unsatisfactorily, you said it was the title of the
novel. Unfortunately, I now have to concede that those stupid game
shows were actually correct (but they aren't always, ha).

The origin and purpose of my confusion are still a total mystery...

---
William Ernest "Lincoln Is Buried In Grant's Tomb" Reid
kelpzoidzl
2015-06-23 02:23:42 UTC
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The first line tells the title of the manuscript. "Lolita...etc." read better.
kelpzoidzl
2015-06-23 16:14:13 UTC
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Damn. I just finished binge watching Mad Men on Netflix. Except for the second half of season season.which I'll have to wait for.

I had no idea how great it was, had no idea it was about the 60's, but glad I didn't suffer watching it weekly with Ads.

It's as good as Buffy. Better then Sooranos, Breaking Bad, or anything going.

Has a great Kubrick, 2001 nod. Really a smart show.
kelpzoidzl
2015-06-23 23:36:17 UTC
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Foundation the remaining 7 episodes of finale on iTunes for 2.99 each.

The show is spectacular, just as people were saying. A show about an Ad agency, didn't sound appealing at all.

A++++
kelpzoidzl
2015-06-25 20:51:24 UTC
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Ipad auto complete sucks
kelpzoidzl
2015-06-25 20:57:22 UTC
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I ended up watching the last 7 episodes of Mad Men on Amazon. It was annoying that it hadcut to blacks where commercials ha been. Netflix had been perfect. The quick cuts were an annoyance on Amazon.

Amazing show, amazing ending. Greatest TV drama ever. A must see.
h***@gmail.com
2015-06-19 22:48:36 UTC
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Post by Don Stockbauer
Clarke liked to promote the exposure to vacuum idea, he used it in other stories of his. From what I understand, Clarke and Kubrick had parted ways when Kubrick came up with the exposure to vacuum without a helmet scenes. Clarke apparently approved of what Kubrick came up with.
I read Lolita many years ago, but never Nabokov's screenplay. Much of the book was in French, but if you couldn't read the French you got the idea pretty well from the English.
In what alternate universe was "much" of "Lolita" "in French"? Particularly
since Nabokov specifically said he wanted to write the book in English as a
tribute to the English language.

---
William Ernest "Parlez Vouz Idiote?" Reid
Don Stockbauer
2015-06-20 02:31:08 UTC
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Well, the copy I read was perhaps 30% in French, which I had to skip, now maybe I got aholt of some joke version, who knows?????
kelpzoidzl
2015-06-21 22:35:47 UTC
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List of French phrases in Lolita chapter by chapter

Guide to French and Latin (incomplete)

Foreword
No French phrases
Part One
Chapter 2
(p10) Mon cher petit papa: My dear little dad.
(p11) Lycée: The second and last stage of secondary education in the French educational system; high school.
Chapter 3
(p12) Plage: A sandy bathing beach at a seashore resort.
(p13) Chocolat glacé: Chocolate ice cream.
Chapter 5
(p15) Manqué: Lit. missed, might be used for someone who could have become something but didn't, or somebody who was a failure at something. In the case of the book it means more 'lacking'; he's referring to those who lack talent See the Wikipedia article on manqué for a full meaning.
(p16) Histoire Abrégée de la poésie anglaise: A Brief History of English Poetry.
(p20) Enfant charmante et fourbe: Charming and cheating child
Chapter 6
(p21) Frétillement: wriggling.
(p21) Cent: one hundred.
(p21) Tant pis: too bad.
(p21) Monsieur: sir, mister; a John (patronizer of prostitutes).
(p22) Bidet: A fixture similar in design to a toilet that is straddled for washing the genitals and the anal area.
(p22) Petit Cadeau: small gift (the money exchanged).
(p22) Dix-huit: Eighteen.
(p22) Oui, ce n'est pas bien: Yes, this is not good.
(p22) Grues: cranes; slang for prostitute, from the observation that cranes (both the bird and the lifting machine), like prostitutes on the street corner, stand on one leg.
(p22) Il était malin, celui qui a inventé ce truc-là: The one who invented that thing was clever.
(p22) Posé un lapin: to stand someone up (for a date).
(p22) Tu est bien gentil de dire ça: You are very kind to say that.
(p22) Avant qu'on se couche: Before we lay down (before we have sex).
(p23) Je vais m'acheter des bas: I'm going to buy myself some stockings.
(p23) Regardez-moi cette belle brune: Do look at that beautiful brunette.
(p23) Qui pourrait arranger la chose: Who could arrange the thing.
(p24) Son argent: Her money.
(p24) Lui: Him.
Chapter 7
(p25) Mes malheurs: My misfortunes.
(p25) Français moyen: Average Frenchman.
Chapter 8
(p25) Pot-au-feu: Beef stew.
(p25) À la gamine: Like a playful, mischievous girl.
(p26) mairie: Town/City hall.
(p26) baba: (type of cake).
(p26) Paris-Soir: (large-circulation daily newspaper in Paris, France from 1923-1944).
(p27) Mon oncle d'Amérique: My uncle from America.
(p27) préfecture: (administrative jurisdiction or subdivision in any of various countries and within some international church structures).
(p28) Mais qui est-ce?: But who is it?
(p28) Jean Christophe:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean-Christophe
(p29) j'ai denabbde pardonne: excuse me.
(p29) est-ce que j'ai puis: I wish I could do it.
(p29) le gredin: The rogue/rascal.
Chapter 10
(p40) fruit vert: green fruit.
(p40) Au fond, ça m'est bien égal: I don't care either way.
Chapter 11
(p40) en escalier: On stairs.
(p43) Delectatio morosa: A pleasure taken in sinful thought or imagination, such as brooding on sexual images.
(p43) Je m'imagine cela: I can imagine that.
(p44) ne montrez pas vos zhambes: Don't show your legs.
(p44) à mes heures: in my spare time
(p47) le mot juste: The perfectly appropriate word or phrase for the situation.
(p47) la vermeillette fente: the ruby slit (vulva).
(p47) un petit mont feutré de mousse délicate: a felt hillock of delicate mousse (woman's hairy but silky sexual organ).
(p47) tracé sur le milieu d'un fillet escarlatte: drawn on the middle of a net escarlatte (?)
(p49) Ces matins gris si doux: These gray mornings, so soft
(p51) primo: firstly
(p51) secundo: secondly
(p53) Mais allez-y, allez-y: But onwards, onwards
(p55) manège: The art of training and riding horses.
Chapter 17
(p70) pavor nocturnus: Night terrors
(p70) peine forte et dure: Hard and forceful punishment/strong and forceful pain
(p70) quel mot: What (a) word
(p72) Une petite attention: Literally "a little attention", a small act of concern
Chapter 18
(p74) soi-disant: So-called, or Self-styled
(p74+) chéri: Beloved
Chapter 21
Ce qui me rend folle, c'est que je ne sais à quoi tu penses quand tu es comme ça: What makes me mad is that I don't know what you're thinking when you're like that
Chapter 25
(p105) Eh bien, pas du tout!: Well, not at all!
Part Two
Chapter 10
Tic nerveux: nervous tremor
Chapter 11
Emigre: emigrant
Chapter 23
Comme il faut: proper (fm. properly)
Chapter 24
Garcon: waiter
Chapter 25
Chambres garnies: furnished rooms
Que c'etatit loin, tout cela!: It was far away - all this!
kelpzoidzl
2015-06-21 23:02:57 UTC
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Post by h***@gmail.com
Clark complained that Stanley was difficult to work with and deceptive
when he tried to publish the novel before the movie came out. Burgess did
a little griping about Kubrick's movie, but not enough to stop him from
handling the publicity tour duties for the movie (he went on all the talk
shows in lieu of Kubrick).

This has been bugging me for a while now, it's related to a game show
or shows. What IS the first line of the novel "Lolita"? I'm not sure
exactly, and I don't want to dig around for the book, but I'm pretty
sure it's not "Lolita.", as some game shows claim...(for $250,000, what
is the first line spoken in "2001", actual dollar amount question, I
could answer it in my sleep).

---
William Ernest "It Also Was Not 'Lolita'" Reid >>>>>>>

"Lolita, or the Confessions of a White Widowed Male......"

Nabokov's screenplay begins with a Prologue of Lolita speaking, a few lines of a voice-over, "Oh what does it matter....." then goes to the explanation of the manuscript being a poorly typed manyscript written by Humbert in prison, given by psychiatrist, Dr. Ray.
kelpzoidzl
2015-06-21 23:18:40 UTC
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The title "Lolita or confessions of a white widowed male" itself, is the beginnng words of the novel.


Burgess made horrible remarks about Kubrick on went on and on. Clarke and Nabokov just voiced some mlld annoyance, but took it in stride.
kelpzoidzl
2015-06-21 23:18:56 UTC
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The title "Lolita or confessions of a white widowed male" itself, is the beginnng words of the novel.


Burgess made horrible remarks about Kubrick on went on and on. Clarke and Nabokov just voiced some mlld annoyance, but took it in stride.
d***@gmail.com
2015-07-02 04:26:22 UTC
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Post by Don Stockbauer
That subject is true.
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MickeyMoop
2015-11-30 17:29:26 UTC
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Post by Don Stockbauer
That subject is true.
Yes. Yes it was. It was all true. One true sentence. And you'll see ratios where there are no ratios and Taschens where there are no Taschens and on that day Stanley will be having a good time, yes? Maybe? In a Tesseract at the end of this Groupe, righty-right GEN you ole'savingsundloan. Operation DON the Visionary. Happy Festivus to all and to all a Happy Childshallleadthem Fair
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